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10 Most Dangerous Camping Destinations in the US

So, what's the natural attraction that has been attracting hundreds of millions of visitors from all over the United States every year? Indeed, it's the America's 63 national parks that gets visitors lined up early in morning to catch a glimpse of nature's uninhibited attraction. Camping is an entertaining activity and friends & families love sitting around a crackling fire roasting wienies and marshmallows with the stars to keep you company. But natural predators and some reckless thrill in certain camping destination pose a threat. But these famed natural attractions are not dangerous on the whole, but there are more than 300 deaths inside U.S National Parks annually on average. Fatalities have been caused due to drowning, car accidents, or falls and deaths from incidents like grizzly bear attacks or snake bites are rare.

Bright Angel Trail

Bright Angel Trail

Grand Canyon is amongst the most exquisite geological wonders and an acclaimed spot for campers. The Bright Angel Trail has a very steep route to the bottom and an exhausting 4,380 feet descent. Undoubtedly, it has been nicknamed "The Devil's Corkscrew" and it poses a real threat as the temperature rises above 110 degrees Fahrenheit. Many campers take precautionary measures for dehydration or even heart attacks. The Park authorities have installed water, phone, and ranger stations along the route for a speedy rescue.

Death Valley

Death Valley

Extending 140-miles across southern California and Nevada, Death Valley is a part of the Mojave Desert. Travelers visiting here rave about it's a great place for hiking, birdwatching, and stargazing. Plenty of dangers such as rattlesnakes, scorpions, and black widow spiders exist along with deadly critters and above all the heat is one of the biggest threat. During the summer season, the temperatures on the sand can go as high as 130 degrees Fahrenheit. If you go unprepared, it'll lead to dehydration or even death. Many visitors have gotten lost, such as the German family who went missing in 1996, only to have their bones recovered thirteen years later.

Denali National Park

Denali National Park

For those who wish to explore the Alaskan wilderness, Denali National Park along with 20,310 feet above sea level Mount Rainier, provides excellent opportunity to stay and sleep in the great Alaskan outdoors. But a breathtaking experience never comes without its dangers, being the tallest mountain in North America, climbers can fall prey to the frigid temperatures, blizzards, and avalanches. Another threat comes from the grizzly bears as they can sense the food left outside or some campers wander too close to a mama and her cubs while out on a hike.

Glacier National Park

Glacier National Park

Perched on the border of Montana and Canadian province of British Columbia, travelers get astonished with stunning views of greens, blues, and whites, on the hiking trails. Visitors can explore as much as 734 hiking trails and thirteen different campgrounds along with opens spaces for fishing, boating and if coming in winter season then skiing. However, you need to be mindful of the natural dangers, such as rockslides and avalanches, that pose an ever-present threat to hikers, mountain climbers, and passersby. Plenty of inexperienced campers find it difficult to handle the slippery trails and if you wander far from the marked paths, you can fall over 500 feet into the gorge. The Glacier National Park is famous for the Night of the Grizzlies when two women were killed at different campsites on the same night.

Glen Canyon National Recreation Area

Glen Canyon National Recreation Area

Stretching from northern Arizona to southern Utah, Glen Canyon National Recreation Area is covering 1.25 million acres of land. Composed of massive cliffs overlooking winding rivers and lakes, this national recreation area is frequently visited by campers interested in water activities like kayaking and fishing. Plenty of unfortunate accidents have taken place while swimming and boating, and here Cliff jumping is also a concern. Many daredevils push their luck while jumping from as high as fifty feet and hitting the water at almost forty miles an hour. Such foolhardiness has led to dozens of deaths over the years.

Great Smoky Mountains National Park

Great Smoky Mountains National Park

Set in the states of Tennessee and North Carolina, Great Smoky Mountains National Park is the most visited national park in the United States. Campers love the sight of dense forests and mountains and the conditions are perfect for activities like camping, hiking, skiing, and horseback riding. The park has been posing serious risks for motorists who make up the highest death toll every year. Frequent and uncertain Hairpin turns, slippery roads, and poor visibility due to heavy fog are three frequent threats that cause collisions. Few incidents have been reported for natural dangers that include waterfalls, forest fires, and even bee attacks.

Lake Mead National Recreation Area

Lake Mead National Recreation Area

Located just 24 miles from the razzle-dazzle of Las Vegas, Lake Mead National Recreation Area is stretching from the border of Nevada to Arizona. Renowned to be the largest reservoir of the United States, it metamorphoses the typical brown and orange desert landscape into a sparkling, blue paradise. Park Rangers at Lake Mead have constantly warned campers about getting tricked into a false sense of security. The water is very risky an d it has been claiming lives of innocent swimmers and boaters. The natural power of the reservoir triggers the incidents and it's not much about consuming alcohol.

Mount Rainier National Park

Mount Rainier National Park

Ascending 14,000 feet above sea level, Mount Rainier is the mightiest peak in the Cascade Range of the Pacific Northwest. It is a famed destination for campers and mountain climbers, but should be refrained by the inexperienced. Annually, almost 10,000 people attempt to summit the peak, but only half make it before they are compelled to turn back. Many campers and mountaineers are not prepared to face the biting cold and brutal winds that give way to hypothermia even in the summer months. Unpredictable rock falls and dangerous avalanches are a constant threat, with the latter killing eleven people in a single incident in the 1980s. And of course, falling off the mountain is also a real possibility.

Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument

Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument

Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument is befittingly named for the cactuses that dot this large stretch of Arizonian desert. Acknowledged an International Biosphere Reserve by the United Nations, so it is frequently visited for research on desert ecosystems and climate change. The persistent problem of drug smugglers and human traffickers fleeing to or from Mexico has caused seventy percent of the park closed for campers due to all the other unlawful goings-on.

The Wave

The Wave

A bright orange, striped sandstone formation; the wave is a jaw-dropping landscape. Situated on the northern Arizona border, it has been popularly nicknamed as “The Devil’s Playground”. As per the fact of unmarked trails, the dizzying terrain, spotty cell service, and temperatures that can go above 100 degrees Fahrenheit, the hikers can find themselves amidst extreme heat that may cause cardiac arrests. Only twenty visitors are allowed per day, staying at nearby campsites and provided with maps and directions to have a satisfying time in the wave.